PMC turning a blind eye to Mula hyacinth

Neha Basudkar
Tuesday, 21 May 2019

Even after repeated complaints made to Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) by the residents living close to Mula river, no steps have been taken by the civic body to remove the hyacinth, the residents claimed. 

Pune: Even after repeated complaints made to Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) by the residents living close to Mula river, no steps have been taken by the civic body to remove the hyacinth, the residents claimed. 

The PMC on the other hand said that it will take around a month to remove the hyacinth and meetings over the issue will be 
conducted soon.

A doctor and resident of Mount Vert Society in Khadki, Vitthal Savaskar, said, “Till January, the hyacinth had been removed. But after elections, it has been noticed that the civic body is not taking any steps to remove the hyacinth. And as a result, the mosquitoe menace has increased. The societies situated close to riverside are getting affected the most.”

Another resident of Raghukul Nagari Society situated on Aundh Road, Uttam Bhairat, said, “We have been continuously following up with PMC requesting them to remove the hyacinth, but they are turning a blind eye towards it. Children are unable to step out to play in the evening. The situation is turning from bad to worse.”

A policemen and a resident of Raviraj Society situated close of Mula river, Munaf Shaik, said, “The hyacinth has turned from green to brown, which states that it has not been removed from last several days or weeks maybe. Nights are becoming unbearable as mosquitoes are rapidly increasing, which are resulting in sleepless nights.”

Over this issue, the Assistant Medical Officer of PMC, Sanjeev Wavare, said, “We will be soon conducting a meeting to discuss the hyacinth removal. The main reason for hyacinth is discharge of untreated sewage and detergent water. We cannot control this, as we have less manpower and ill-equipped mechanism. Therefore, we are stressing on removing it manually. But it will take time, maybe a month or two.”

According to an expert in botany and ecology, Ketaki Ghate, who is a founder of Oikos consultancy working in natural resource management, “Invasive plant eichhornia crassipes, commonly known as common water hyacinth, is growing in the rivers of the city. This is aggravated because of eutrophication i.e. sewage added to waters causing nutrient proliferation due to which aggressive plants like water hyacinth increase in a carpet like form blocking sunlight and ultimately creating an anaerobic environment, which further affects all other aquatic life form groups like diatoms, rotifers, insects, crustaceans, fishes, etc.”

“This can be prevented if the sewage water does not enter the natural water streams and disturb the whole arena of water ecosystem,” Ghate added.

​ ​

Related News