‘Such missions provide an impetus to other fields’

Manasi Saraf Joshi
Tuesday, 16 July 2019

Director, Nehru Planetarium, Nehru Centre, Arvind Paranjpye, said, “Whether it is Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) or NASA, they do not work independently for any mission. They need help from various quarters of the society, like fine engineering, precise technology, raw material and others.”

Pune: Exploring space is not limited to the quest for finding extraterrestrial presence, but it also implies the status of a country by providing it great power. India’s Chandrayaan I and Chandrayaan II (Chandrayaan II was called off due to a technical glitch a few minutes before the scheduled launch on Monday) missions were too a part of proving the prowess in terms of technical know-how and self-sufficiency.

Director, Nehru Planetarium, Nehru Centre, Arvind Paranjpye, said, “Whether it is Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) or NASA, they do not work independently for any mission. They need help from various quarters of the society, like fine engineering, precise technology, raw material and others.”

Paranjpye added, “Whenever such missions are carried out, it gives a tremendous impetus to various fields working in the area of technology, engineering and research, which over a period of time benefits the society.” 

“For example, if we have developed a technology to make a space suit, then the same technology can be applied to make a suit which can save firefighters,” he said. Science enthusiast Mayuresh Prabhune said, “Every country needs to be self-reliant in its financial matters, defence and other sectors. Space is yet another emerging field, which is eyed by the majority of the countries across the globe.”

“Such missions also imbibe confidence among fellow countrymen and helps to encourage the scientific temperament among other things,” said Mayuresh adding that when the Mars mission was planned by ISRO, it had involvement of 30 companies and some 150 university students across the country. He further added that India got the recognition for launching the missions in low-cost with adequate accuracy and top-class engineering. 

Paranjpye added, “When Indian scientists were busy creating Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT), questions were raised over its use, feasibility and need. Today, GMRT has helped us scale the ladder in the observatory world. It also helps various industries to gain business, help students for research and various other factors related to it.”

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