FOR THE RECORD

Saturday, 16 November 2019

Ahead of World Heritage Week, which is celebrated every year from November 19 to 25  to make people aware of the importance of ancient cultural heritage and its preservation, we offer glimpses of our built heritage

SANCHI STUPA, MADHYA PRADESH: On a hill overlooking the plain and about 40 km from Bhopal, the site of Sanchi comprises a group of Buddhist monuments (monolithic pillars, palaces, temples and monasteries), most of which date back to the 2nd and 1st centuries BC (Pic: Bindu Rao)

Ahead of World Heritage Week, which is celebrated every year from November 19 to 25  to make people aware of the importance of ancient cultural heritage and its preservation, we offer glimpses of our built heritage

SANCHI STUPA, MADHYA PRADESH: On a hill overlooking the plain and about 40 km from Bhopal, the site of Sanchi comprises a group of Buddhist monuments (monolithic pillars, palaces, temples and monasteries), most of which date back to the 2nd and 1st centuries BC (Pic: Bindu Rao)

CHHHATRAPATI SHIVAJI TERMINUS, MUMBAI: Formerly known as Victoria Terminus Station, CSTM is an outstanding example of Victorian Gothic Revival architecture in India, blended with themes deriving from Indian traditional architecture.The terminal was built over 10 years, starting in 1878 (Pic: Prashant Sawant)

HUMAYUN’S TOMB, DELHI: Built in the 1560s with the patronage of Humayun’s son, the great Emperor Akbar, this one is far grander than any tomb built before in the Islamic world . Persian and Indian craftsmen worked together to build parts of it (Pic: Payel Thakur)

SERAMPORE RAJBARI: Also known as Goswami bari of Serampore, this is the oldest Zamindar structure standing in Bengal today. Now the building is a hotspot for movie shootings and has become one of the iconic heritage structures in the state (Pic: Debarchan Chatterjee)

GROUP OF MONUMENTS, HAMPI: The grandiose site of Hampi comprises mainly the remnants of the capital city of Vijayanagara Empire (14th-16th Cent CE), the last great Hindu Kingdom. Located in Bellary district, Karnataka, Hampi’s spectacular setting is dominated by river Tungabhadra, craggy hill ranges and open plains, with widespread remains which include forts, royal and sacred complexes, pillared halls, memorial structures, gateways, defence check posts, stables, water structures and so on (Pic: Rashmi Gopal Rao)

ONE OF THE POLS OF AHMEDABAD: The city has a rich heritage of settlement patterns. Following the communal riots of 1714 and the civil disorder of the 18th century, the houses built in the city were organised in dense clusters consisting of a set of dead end streets entered through a single gateway. (Pic: Pradeep Chamaria)

The famous Murud Janjira fort from Alibaug. There are two versions of the history of this place- one saying that it was built in the 16th century for fishermen to live peacefully away from pirates while another saying that the Abyssinian Siddis established it in early 1100 (Pic: Payel Thakur)

Victoria Memorial Hall was built between 1906–1921 in memory of Queen Victoria. In 1901, after her demise, the then Viceroy of India suggested that a fitting memorial in the Queen’s memory be built (Pic: Debarchan Chatterjee)

THE NILGIRI MOUNTAIN RAILWAY: The Mountain Railways of India consist of the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway located in the foothills of the Himalayas in West Bengal having an area of 5.34 ha, the Nilgiri Mountain Railways located in the Nilgiri Hills of Tamil Nadu with an area of 4.59 ha and the Kalka Shimla Railway located in the Himalayan foothills of Himachal Pradesh with an area of 79.06 ha. They are outstanding examples of hill railways. Opened between 1881 and 1908, they applied bold and ingenious engineering solutions to the problem of establishing an effective rail link across a mountainous terrain of great beauty. All three are still fully operational (Pic: Rashmi Gopal Rao)

THE ELEPHANTA CAVES: These are located in Western India on Elephanta Island (otherwise known as Gharapuri), which features two hillocks separated by a narrow valley. These archaeological remains reveal evidence of occupation from as early as the 2nd century BC. The rock-cut Elephanta Caves were constructed in the mid-5th to 6th centuries AD. The most important among the caves is the Cave 1, which measures 39 metre from the front entrance to the back (Pic: Prashant Sawant)

THE ROCK SHELTERS OF BHIMBETKA: Situated in the foothills of the Vindhyan Mountains are five clusters of natural rock shelters, displaying paintings that appear to date from the Mesolithic Period right through to the historical period. The cultural traditions of the inhabitants of the 21 villages adjacent to the site bear a strong resemblance to those represented in the rock paintings (Pic: Bindu Rao)

THE CHAMPANER-PAVAGADH ARCHAEOLOGICAL PARK: With its ancient Hindu architecture, temples and special water retaining installations together, dating back to the 16th century, the park represents cultures which have disappeared. The structures represent a perfect blend of Hindu-Muslim architecture, mainly in the Great Mosque (Jama Masjid) (Pic: Pradeep Chamaria)