Timely meals lower cancer risk: Study

Namrata Devikar
Saturday, 28 July 2018

Healthy lifestyle a  must

Around 27% of breast cancer cases adhered to a healthy lifestyle compared to 31 per cent from the random selection.

A similar difference was observed for prostate cancer as well

Pune: In a recent paper published in the International Journal of Cancer (IJC) suggests that eating dinner before 9 pm and going to bed at least 2 hours after finishing the meal both significantly lower the risk for both breast and prostate cancer. The research was conducted on Spanish population between 2008 and 2013. These two cancers have already been shown to be linked to night shift work.

The author of the paper is Manolis Kogevinas, MD, PhD, the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Spain. 
According to the paper published, eating prior to 9 pm was similarly associated with about a 20 per cent lower risk for both cancers compared with eating after 10 pm highlighting that the effect for prostate cancer was slightly more than for breast cancer.

The research paper states that this is the first epidemiological study showing the long-term health effects associated with mistimed eating patterns. Around 1,738 breast incident and 1,112 prostate incident cancer cases aged between 20 years and 85 years and 1,910 women and 1,493 men were randomly selected from primary health centres. Around 27 per cent of breast cancer cases adhered to a healthy lifestyle compared to 31 per cent from the random selection. Moreover, a similar difference was observed for prostate cancer as well. 

Nearly all participants had breakfast, lunch and supper about a third had an afternoon snack and about 7 per cent had an after supper snack. Breakfast was on average around 8:30 am, lunch at 2 pm and supper at 9 pm.

Speaking to Sakal Times, Dr Amit Bhatt, consultant oncologist at the Avinash Cancer Clinic from the city said diet has always been a major factor in disease control.

“What you eat makes a big impact on your body. Common diseases like diabetes and obesity have improper dietary habits as a contributing factor and switching over to the correct diet as a part of the whole treatment plan. Cancer is no exception to this rule and this study has supported the belief of proper dietary patterns,” said Dr Bhatt.

The present study suggests that changes in the timing of circadian, that is 24-hour rhythm, controlled activities in sleep or diet that are less extreme than those observed in night shift work, are associated with long-term health effects increasing the risk of the most prevalent cancers worldwide.

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