Teachers continue to protest for recruitment process

Prajakta Joshi
Friday, 8 February 2019

The eligible and qualified candidates, hailing from several drought-prone areas in the State, wait for the teachers’ recruitment process to start, as they continue their hunger strike under the banner of DTEd BEd Students Association. 

PUNE: “If we are appointed soon, we will make the government-run schools in the State much better than any other private English medium schools,” say the candidates eligible for the proposed and prolonged teachers’ recruitment, who are protesting in the city for the past four days.

The eligible and qualified candidates, hailing from several drought-prone areas in the State, wait for the teachers’ recruitment process to start, as they continue their hunger strike under the banner of DTEd BEd Students Association. 

With no other teaching jobs in sight or any other alternative source of income, these youths, who have cleared their DEd-BEd and other qualifications years ago, are desperately waiting for the government’s clearance on the recruitment process.

Also, while it is said that advertisements for only around 1,000 vacancies may be published by the 15th of this month, the protesters are not ready to budge until all, that is more than 20,000 vacancies that are available, are filled by the government.

Waiting day and night for the officials to pay heed to their struggle, the candidates share their grievances and stories with Sakal Times.

CASE STUDY 1: Amol Gaikwad
As Amol Gaikwad, a well-qualified teacher from a drought-prone village of Latur waits outside the State Education Commissioner’s office in city, protesting for the teachers’ recruitment process in the state to start, he has just one question to ask, “Despite being eligible and merit holders, why are the jobs that we deserve being held back from us for so long?” In the absence of the recruitment, Gaikwad works as a farm labourer in his village, only to be mocked at by the villagers for being jobless. 

“They ask my father that if ultimately I was to work as a labourer, why did he spend so much money on my education. In my village, people without proper qualification are getting recruited in private schools with the use of political influence. Since we followed put our faith in government, we are unemployed and suffering. Does the government want to wait until we also start committing suicide like the farmers?” Gaikwad questioned.

CASE STUDY 2: Abhijeet Raut
“My parents passed away when I was very young. My two younger siblings and I were brought up by my paternal uncle. I have cleared my DEd in 2013, and the Teachers Eligibility Test subsequently. I am now expected to take care of my family, and here I am struggling to get a job,” Abhijeet Raut, one of the protesters from Osmanabad said.

He also added that taking a job at a private school is of no use, especially in a rural area, since it pays way too less, and it is practically impossible to take care of a family with such meagre income. He further said, “I have always been a meritorious student all my life. I never knew that despite scoring so well, I would be forced to stay unemployed just because of the apathy of the government towards us. There are many like me, who are doing odd jobs in the city to support themselves until they finally get a job they deserve.”

CASE STUDY 3: Anuradha Ghule
Coming from Beed, one of the worst drought-affected regions in the state, Anuradha Ghule said that finding a different job is also not an option for her.  “There are no other jobs, no farm work available due to drought. Teaching is and has always been my passion. However, it is very disheartening to see unqualified people working as teachers, when we, who are passionate and qualified, sit jobless. Many of the teachers protesting here are going through a huge amount of mental stress because of this,” Ghule expressed.

CASE STUDY 4: Damodar Gadade
For Damodar Gadade, a protesting candidate from a remote village in Sengaon taluka in Hingoli district, it is depressing to see the Zilla Parishad school in his village suffering due to lack of teachers. 

“I always wanted to be a teacher. The ZP school in my village has a strength of 150 students and has just one teacher. The teacher has to take care of all the classes, as well as carry out the administrative work of the school. How will he be able to deliver quality education in such a situation? Such is the scenario at many schools across the State, and yet, they are not ready to give us the work.” he asserted.

Gadade is also physically challenged and said that even though recruitment starts, with the issue of bogus disability certificates unattended, there is hardly any chance of getting recruited under that quota.

Related News