Sewage Treatment Plants mandatory in hospitals with more than 10 beds

ST Correspondent
Tuesday, 17 April 2018

Pune: Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) are now made mandatory for hospitals with more than 10 beds, the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) has said. Earlier, having a sewage treatment plant was mandatory for hospitals with more than 100 beds but with recent amendments to the biomedical waste guidelines by the Union Ministry of Environment, smaller hospitals are now under this rule, informed Dr Amar Supate from MPCB.

Pune: Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) are now made mandatory for hospitals with more than 10 beds, the Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) has said. Earlier, having a sewage treatment plant was mandatory for hospitals with more than 100 beds but with recent amendments to the biomedical waste guidelines by the Union Ministry of Environment, smaller hospitals are now under this rule, informed Dr Amar Supate from MPCB.

Dr Amar Supate from MPCB said that as per the amendments to the biomedical waste guidelines by the Union Ministry of Environment on March 16, 2018, hospitals with over 10 beds must have a sewage water treatment system.

He further added that as the amendments to biomedical waste guidelines are issued by the ministry recently, MPCB will see to it that all hospitals fulfil the requirement of having a sewage water treatment system within the coming six months.

“At present, we are giving directives to hospitals who are approaching MPCB for water sanctions or other permissions to set up a sewage treatment plant. These hospitals will ideally be given a year’s time to set up this system but we will ensure that this is done in the coming six months itself,” mentioned Supate.

However, many doctors’ organisation are not happy about it. Dr Sanjay Patil, member of Indian Medical Association (IMA), said that this rule to have a sewage water treatment plant for smaller hospitals is practically not feasible.

“Sewage water treatment plants require a substantial space on the ground floor, which is a big constraint. Many smaller hospitals are situated on the second or third floors of a building and hence it becomes practically not viable. Also, the sewage treatment plants require an expenditure of roughly Rs 30,000 to Rs 40,000 per month, which makes it financially non-viable,” added Dr Patil.

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