RSS doesn't want 'opposition mukt Bharat': Bhagwat

ST Correspondent
Sunday, 1 April 2018

Pune: Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat said the sangh does not speak the language of making India 'mukt' (free) of opposition and such talk is political language. 

"We do not use such language in the sangh. For us, even the opposition is a collaborator in the project of nation building. We saw how European nations once fought bloody wars with each other, but have today united and cooperate. There are different people with different ideas here too and it will take time to bring them together," he said. 

Pune: Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat said the sangh does not speak the language of making India 'mukt' (free) of opposition and such talk is political language. 

"We do not use such language in the sangh. For us, even the opposition is a collaborator in the project of nation building. We saw how European nations once fought bloody wars with each other, but have today united and cooperate. There are different people with different ideas here too and it will take time to bring them together," he said. 

He was responding to strategy expert Sandeep Waslekar's speech at a book publication organised by Maharashtra Sahitya Kala Prasarini Sabha here at Balgandharva Rangmandir on Sunday. Waslekar, in his speech, said there is a trend of talking about making an 'opposition-mukt Bharat' on both sides. 

Waslekar, who is also president of the Strategic Foresight Group, said India is seeing the narrative of ridding India of opposition ideologies. "Some talk of eliminating the RSS from India and some talk of a 'Congress-Mukt Bharat'. Both these organisations were formed after years of contribution. We should talk of an inclusive India rather than talking of what should we get rid of," Waslekar said. 

Waslekar and Bhagwat were speaking at a programme to publish three books written or translated by Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India, Dnyaneshwar Mulay. 

Mulay said, "I still remember the day I left my village to go to Japan. As I was crossing the bridge, I couldn't see anyone before me or behind me and I felt alone. But my parents, the saints of Maharashtra, our freedom fighters, authors, artists and culture were with me." 

He said, "The world of diplomacy and politics was so different from my background. Diplomacy felt like an alien field when I decided to work for the common man. I established the first business organisation in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union. I established the first cultural centre in a completely Islamic country like Maldives. All ideas and innovation that I could contribute were found in India and its culture. More than Tennyson or Shakespeare, Kalidasa is beloved to me." 

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