Pandit Vyas to perform at BRICS Vocal Concert in China

ST Correspondent
Saturday, 16 September 2017

Speaking about the condition of classical music in India, where people argue that the number of learners for this music is deteriorating due to western influence, Vyas seems to think otherwise

Pune: City-based renowned Classical Singer Pandit Suhas Vyas is all set to perform at the ‘BRICS Vocal Concert’ at Xiamen Artistic Theatre in China next week, through his Hindustani classical renditions.

Vyas will be performing as part of the BRICS Cultural Festival on September 16.

“I am extremely excited and honoured to present our art on this global level. Also, representatives of various countries and ethnicity would be present, so I am looking forward to perform in front of them. Along with honour, it is also a great responsibility for me as I am representing our music fraternity,” Vyas said.

As he will be representing the nation and Indian culture, he will be presenting patriotic compositions. Vyas said, “I am going to present a very rare bandish in Raag Yaman ‘Jai Jai Bharat desh hamara naman pratham karu mangal gau’ composed by the stalwart Dr SN Ratanjankar, who was the direct disciple of Pandit Bhatkhande. This composition will be followed by three devotional songs, with patriotic messages.”

Vyas has been empanelled with Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) for over three decades now and he appreciates their constructive efforts to present Indian classical music on the global platform.  “Doyens like Heerabai Boredekar and Pandit DV Paluskar who also toured the world under ICCR panel till date and their body of work has been immense. My father late Pandit CR Vyas, myself and my brother Pandit Satish Vyas (Santoor maestro) have always been glad and honoured to perform for ICCR, within India and across the globe too. Indian classical music is received with extreme respect and lot of appreciation across the globe,” he added.

Speaking about the condition of classical music in India, where people argue that the number of learners for this music is deteriorating due to western influence, Vyas seems to think otherwise.

“Indian classical music is timeless and it is always here to stay. Our previous generations have passed the baton to us and my generation is doing the same. We have some bright artistes in the current generation too. Our music is mainly spiritual and brings in peace, therefore, it will always attract the right audience. We also have organisations like ICCR which deputes teachers across the globe to teach our music which is a fantastic initiative, and thus grooming the future students,” Vyas concluded.

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