Man from Latur treated for a rare liver disease

Sakal Times
Tuesday, 16 January 2018

The young man had a blockage in the largest blood vessel in the body, which carries blood from lower half of the body to the heart. The blockage was as long as 2.5 cm. 

Pune: A 28-year-old man from Latur was diagnosed with Budd Chiari syndrome, a disease of the liver, which affects one in a million adults. This is caused due to blockage of hepatic venous outflow, due to which blood cannot leave the liver, leading to cirrhosis. He was found to have multiple dilated veins all over chest, abdomen and back, and was treated at a city-based hospital.

The young man had a blockage in the largest blood vessel in the body, which carries blood from lower half of the body to the heart. The blockage was as long as 2.5 cm. The long blockage of Inferior Venacava (IVC) was of the vein that takes blood from lower half of the body to the heart.

The blockage carried a high risk for the patient if he was not operated upon in time. This blockage affected multiple veins all over his chest, abdomen and back. 

The patient, who does not wish to be named, visited Aditya Birla Hospital on December 1 last year, with complaints of swelling on the lower limb and thickening of the skin. He was suffering from this problem for last three years, but no one could diagnose the reason for the same.

Dr Sambhaji Pawal, Interventional Radiologist at Aditya Birla Hospital said the cause of swelling of limb and thickening of skin was occlusion (blockage) of IVC. 

“When we diagnosed this, we put a 22 mm stent in the IVC. It relieved the obstruction and instant changes were visible. Leg symptoms reversed, chest-abdominal wall veins disappeared and the ongoing damage to the liver stopped,” said Pawal.

The patient said he thought there was some issue with his leg.

Dr Prabath Mondel, Interventional Radiologist, said the IVC is the largest blood vessel in the body. 

“Considering the length and location of the blockage, it was a challenging surgery, which was performed without opening up the patient. A slight mistake could have been fatal for the patient. Also, the size of this block was also long, and it is rare to have such long blockages,” said Dr Mondel.

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