Foreign nationals develop taste for Indian foods during Ramzan

Sakal Times
Thursday, 15 June 2017

Although they miss delicacies served back home, they frequent local food stalls

Pune: Foodies across religious lines, including foreigners residing in Pune, are relishing the delectable fare served at special street-side eateries that have cropped up during Ramzan.

Although those from Islamic countries miss the Iftaar delicacies served back home, they too have developed a liking towards Indian food. Pune houses a large population of youngsters, mostly students, from countries like Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Afghanistan, Lebanon and Turkey.

Although they miss delicacies served back home, they frequent local food stalls

Pune: Foodies across religious lines, including foreigners residing in Pune, are relishing the delectable fare served at special street-side eateries that have cropped up during Ramzan.

Although those from Islamic countries miss the Iftaar delicacies served back home, they too have developed a liking towards Indian food. Pune houses a large population of youngsters, mostly students, from countries like Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Afghanistan, Lebanon and Turkey.

Usama Bin Mazi from Saudi Arabia said, “I do miss food from back home. There is no food like the one cooked at home. The food that we get here for Iftaar is different and yet it’s a great substitute.” Bin Mazi is a student at New Poona College of Arts, Science and Commerce in Camp.

Prince Ograma, who hails from nothern Nigeria, said, “It is feast time for people in North Nigeria during Ramzan. It is a grand affair there, the cuisines include mutton and raan preparations. However, I like to visit Imdadi (in Camp) every year during this time, because I am a foodie and I love their food preparations.”

Sharif Ali Sheikh of Sharif Caterers in Kausarbaug, Kondhwa, who has been running his stall at different locations in the city for the past 15 years. He said that many foreigners visit his stall every year during Ramzan.

“People from countries like Afghanistan, Sudan, Nigeria, Iran, etc. visit my stall. The food that we serve here is very different than what they eat in their countries. The food there is usually boiled, as opposed to the spicy food that we offer here. However, they have always told me that they love the variety that we have in India, and often visit stalls for Iftaar,” Sheikh said.

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