Child makes 90 pc recovery after falling from third floor

ST Correspondent
Thursday, 26 April 2018

Pune: After surviving a fall from a three-storey building, a one and half-year-old boy, Vihan Wable, has recovered almost 90 per cent, said doctors from city-based Columbia Asia Hospital who treated him. Speaking about the fall, Vihan’s mother, Sonali Wable said that he had recently started walking after which the incident happened.

“On January 28, I and his father had gone out and Vihan was home with his grandmother. He then fell from the balcony. He must have tried to climb as he has just started walking. My neighbours took him to the hospital,” said Wable.

Pune: After surviving a fall from a three-storey building, a one and half-year-old boy, Vihan Wable, has recovered almost 90 per cent, said doctors from city-based Columbia Asia Hospital who treated him. Speaking about the fall, Vihan’s mother, Sonali Wable said that he had recently started walking after which the incident happened.

“On January 28, I and his father had gone out and Vihan was home with his grandmother. He then fell from the balcony. He must have tried to climb as he has just started walking. My neighbours took him to the hospital,” said Wable.

Dr Pravin Survashe, Consultant Neuro-Surgeon at the hospital, said that the when the child was brought to the hospital, the first priority was to check vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure and breathing.

“Basic brain functioning is evaluated by checking the size of the pupils, their response to light and of the nervous response to heat, pinpricks etc. When no movement was found, CT and MRIs were performed to identify sites of skull fracture. Intracranial pressure monitors aided in detecting brain and tissue damage,” said Survashe.

He further added that the brain is well protected from interactions with foreign substances including blood by what is called the blood brain barrier encapsulating the capillaries that pass through.

“When there is bleeding, it means that the barrier has been broken and complications such as a viral or bacterial infection could result. This is usually detected by a lumbar puncture and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid for presence of antibodies as an immune reaction. While operating on the brain, stringent infection control standards have to be maintained if the patient is to survive,” said Survashe.

Dr Ganesh Bagde, paediatric intensive care unit consultant at the hospital said that young children can be administered corticosteroids apart from a dosage of antibiotics to suppress inflammation.

“The brain tissues swell because antibiotics break down the pathogen. This can cause pressure and pain to the victim,” Bagde said.

Talking about the condition of the child now, Survashe said that the child is now walking again and is starting to talk.

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Speaking to Sakal Times, Dr Pravin Survashe said that young children who have started to walk, often experiment a lot. “Homes that are at a height should have higher railing so that the child does not climb and fall. The builders should take up this initiative as it is important for the safety of the residents,” he said.

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