Brain-dead youth’s vital organs give new lease of life to many

ST CORRESPONDENT
Monday, 25 February 2019

“The hospital staff rallied around her decision and supported her in the noble endeavour. The extended family took some convincing but finally agreed. And this is truly a milestone for us,” said Pusalkar.

PUNE: A 22-year-old was declared brain-dead at Jehangir Hospital and his vital organs gave a new lease of life to many patients. The donor met with an accident on a two-wheeler and he was not wearing a helmet.

The 22-year-old was the son of a hospital staffer at Jehangir Hospital. His mother, immediately gave the permission to donate his vital organs. The patient had lost his father at a very young age. He is survived by his younger brother, mother and grandparents.

His both kidneys, liver, heart and cornea were the organs donated. The patient met with an accident on his way to Satara on a bike. 

Doctors from the hospital noted that after the accident, he was taken to a nearby hospital where surgery was done and was brought to Jehangir Hospital on Saturday afternoon. After four checks, he was declared brain-dead. 

Vrinda Pusalkar, the Transplant Co-ordinator at Jehangir Hospital said what is heartening is how the mother was always open to the idea of transplant.

“The hospital staff rallied around her decision and supported her in the noble endeavour. The extended family took some convincing but finally agreed. And this is truly a milestone for us,” said Pusalkar.

One kidney of the donor will give a new lease of life to a 35-year-old woman who is a mother of two children from Jehangir Hospital. 

According to doctors, another kidney and heart were donated to Ruby Hall Clinic and liver was donated to Sahyadri Hospital and corneas to HV Desai Hospital. 

Urologist Deepak Kirpekar, vascular surgeon Dr Dhanesh Kamerkar and nephrologist Dr Sriniwas Ambike operated on the recipient at Jehangir Hospital.

The 35-year-old kidney recipient has been on the waiting list for a long time. “Her mother was to give her the kidney but due to some medical complications has been unable to do so. The surgery was almost like performing a live transplant as while the organ was being removed in one OT, we were having the recipient being ready in the other.” 

Dr Kirpekar termed the gesture as a noble one. “Today, we do get patients who are brought to the hospital while still alive and not left uncared for. What will also change the organ donation scenario and awareness in Maharashtra is if like Tamil Nadu, the government bears the expenses of the recipient’s hospital charges.” 

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