Bill to regulate coaching classes drafted

Prajakta Joshi
Wednesday, 20 December 2017

Pune: In a bid to establish control over private coaching classes, the State could soon pass the Maharashtra Private Coaching Regulation Bill 2018. However, the draft for the bill is currently causing discontent in the coaching class owners community across the State, who are arguing over the imposing of regulations over private entities that are not even a part of formal education.

Reacting to the draft, Durgesh Mangeshkar of IIT Pratishthan said that the Act is going to ‘strangulate’, not ‘regulate’ private
coaching classes.

Pune: In a bid to establish control over private coaching classes, the State could soon pass the Maharashtra Private Coaching Regulation Bill 2018. However, the draft for the bill is currently causing discontent in the coaching class owners community across the State, who are arguing over the imposing of regulations over private entities that are not even a part of formal education.

Reacting to the draft, Durgesh Mangeshkar of IIT Pratishthan said that the Act is going to ‘strangulate’, not ‘regulate’ private
coaching classes.

“The bill will lead to the shutting down of private coaching classes, as most of its clauses are unreasonable, and moreover, the government has also threatened to imprison class owners who don’t abide by these rules. Instead of risking this, the class owners would instead prefer to close down, and the students would be the biggest losers, as their education would be at stake here,” Mangeshkar said.

According to the current draft, a State body will monitor and regulate the fee structure for private coaching classes, considering the region in which the classes are held. Also, in order to bring higher transparency in the affairs of these classes, they are to accept fees strictly by cheque.

The tutorial classes for students from Std I to XII would be included and regulated under this Act, once the bill is passed.
The bill further seeks to regulate the infrastructure provided by the classes, stating that the classes with five or less students would be considered as home tuition.

“The private coaching classes should have a maximum of 80 students, and the classes should provide the students with basic amenities like separate washrooms, parking lot, waiting room, etc. Also, in order to ensure that the students don’t miss classes at schools due to coaching classes, the latter wouldn’t be allowed to be held during the school hours,” the draft states.

Vaibhav Bakliwal of Bakliwal Tutorials, calling the bill ridiculous and unfortunate, questioned that while private coaching classes are made to pay taxes like any profitable organisation, why are these regulatory rules trying to be imposed upon the classes?

“The clauses in the draft are laughable. We are not charitable organisations. Nor are we a part of compulsory education like schools or colleges. The government cannot just try to control us without providing us with any exemptions or subsidies. If all these are imposed on us, education will take a backseat even at the coaching classes,” Bakliwal added.

Speaking about the draft, Gangadhar Mhamane, Education Director, said, “It’s too early to say anything about this bill or the benefits it might have yet, as we have just made a rough draft, and we have to see when it gets passed. The main objective behind drafting this bill, though, is basically to control private coaching classes, the number of which is rising on a high scale, and to regulate their fees so as to help parents and students.”

Related News