ADEH disagrees with revised NMC bill

ST Correspondent
Sunday, 1 April 2018

Pune: Alliance of Doctors for Ethical Health Care (ADEH) express that the revised National Medical Commission (NMC) bill is contradictory in nature and will not curb corruption in medical education. Doctors feel that the improved NMC bill suggested by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on health is welcome but does not address the root cause of degeneration of Medical Council of India (MCI) - the profiteering in medical education through exorbitant fees charged by private medical colleges.

Pune: Alliance of Doctors for Ethical Health Care (ADEH) express that the revised National Medical Commission (NMC) bill is contradictory in nature and will not curb corruption in medical education. Doctors feel that the improved NMC bill suggested by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on health is welcome but does not address the root cause of degeneration of Medical Council of India (MCI) - the profiteering in medical education through exorbitant fees charged by private medical colleges.

Speaking to Sakal Times, Dr Arun Gadre, member of ADEH said that the step is welcoming the inclusion of a paragraph in the preamble of the bill which includes among others, the objective of - access to quality and affordable medical education, access to services of medical professionals by all citizens, promotion of equitable and universal healthcare.

“Though many provisions in the bill directly contravene these stated aims, space has been opened for further advocacy to do away the harmful provisions. The revised NMC Bill does not remedy the malady of the exorbitant cost of medical education due to the unregulated privatisation of medical education,” said Gadre.

He further added that this exorbitant cost has been the main cause of corruption in MCI and also an important cause of the unethical medical practices. 

“The Public Service Commission (PSC) report has opted for regulation of the fees for at least 50 per cent seats in private medical colleges but has not accepted the suggestion that the fees for these seats should be on par with those in government medical colleges. Therefore, medical education in private medical colleges will continue to be very costly even for the seats under fee-regulation. This sadly contravenes the objective stated by the committee in the preamble - affordable medical education. This new fee structure would continue to foster corruption in the medical education system,” said Gadre.

Related News