‘Science, tech emerged during Harappan time’

Sakal Times
Wednesday, 28 February 2018

Pune: “Science and technology emerged during Harappan civilisation and this can be vividly through their style of construction of houses which is still practised in rural India,” said Vasant Shinde, Vice-Chancellor of Deccan University while delivering a talk on ‘Genesis and Relevance of Ancient Science and Technology: Archaeological Perspective’ at The National Centre for Cell Sciences (NCCS) on the occasion of National Science Day on Wednesday.

Pune: “Science and technology emerged during Harappan civilisation and this can be vividly through their style of construction of houses which is still practised in rural India,” said Vasant Shinde, Vice-Chancellor of Deccan University while delivering a talk on ‘Genesis and Relevance of Ancient Science and Technology: Archaeological Perspective’ at The National Centre for Cell Sciences (NCCS) on the occasion of National Science Day on Wednesday.

Shinde, a senior archaeologist, who led an international team of excavators in the Harappan site in Rakhighari in Haryana helped them to rewrite the age of the civilisation to 8,000 years.
“British bond, a style of laying bricks in a vertical and horizontal fashion alternatively, is still practised during building construction was first invented by the Harappans,” he said 

“People of the Harappan civilisation were the best civil engineers which can be seen through their town and city planning. Interestingly, many of these technologies developed during that time are still used in rural parts of India,” said Shinde.

During his talk, he made comparisons between the Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Harappan civilisations and showed how the Harappan people were different from the rest two civilizations.
“While both Egyptians and Mesopotamians followed the monarchy system, where rulers made all those defeated as slaves, it was not the case with the Harappans. They were friendly people, who used their knowledge and resources benefiting the people at large,” he said.

He also told an interesting fact about Harappans which he came across during joint excavations carried out with National Institute of Oceanography (NIO).

“We found that the Harappans had left heaps of sand accumulated right outside the thick compound of their homes,” he said adding though their settlements were not located very close to the sea, they were extra cautious and wanted to keep themselves and their settlements safe from any possible event of the tsunami,” he added.

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