‘I stopped using Tik Tok app because of useless videos’ 

ST Correspondent
Thursday, 18 April 2019

After the ban on gaming applications like PUBG and Momo Challenge, now comes the turn of Tik Tok, a mobile app in which users make short videos with background music. The app is no longer available for download on App Store and Google Play Store.

Pune: After the ban on gaming applications like PUBG and Momo Challenge, now comes the turn of Tik Tok, a mobile app in which users make short videos with background music. The app is no longer available for download on App Store and Google Play Store.
 
The Madras High Court, in its interim order, had asked the government to ban downloading the application after reports that inappropriate content, mostly pornographic in nature, was easily accessible to children. It also posed a threat to children’s privacy in cyber space. 

Later, ByteDance, which owned the application, approached the Supreme Court stating that the decision caused irreparable damage to the company. The next hearing is pending on April 22. Meanwhile, Sakal Times spoke to some of the users of this application.

The app was previously named Musically. Debarati Choudhary, a content writer had stopped using the application after it was renamed Tik Tok because of the nonsensical videos coming on it.  “I used to make fun videos of mostly Paresh Rawal’s character Baburao which people could relate to. Many appreciated my acting skills so I continued making a few more, but, after a while people started making useless videos through the app. I didn’t like it and hence stopped using it,” said Choudhary.
She said the court ban on Tik Tok application is a valid and necessary action.

For some, the app was a getaway from the routine. Users said the video suggestions were received according to their preferences and location, therefore, not everyone was attacked with violent or inappropriate videos.

“Tik Tok was a timepass application for me. It had replaced Instagram. I never found any harmful video requests. For example, I have seen a lot of Italian girls making Tik Tok videos on Hindi songs. Those were really hilarious and impressive,” said Vaibhav Lokhande, a mechanical engineer. 

“I wasn’t obsessed with it, so the ban wouldn’t affect or matter to me much. But I know that with the help of these videos many have become famous,” added Lokhande.

“I would use it to make funny videos of my two-year-old son. And would generally prefer funny videos even when I would make videos for myself. Therefore I personally never explored any violent or disturbing videos in it,” said Khushboo Patwa, an advertising agent.

Patwa said, “If this application is banned now, some other application will replace it sooner or later.”

Clinical psychologist on Tik Tok’s impact 

  • Besides content, these applications have  inherent characteristics like screen addiction and other impact on human psychology. 
  • There is immediate feedback which hooks the users on to it. Also it provides validation from the viewers. 
  • Our brain needs expressional stories which doesn’t happen virtually. In human interaction only seven per cent is verbal and 93 per cent is para-verbal which means one understands the meaning of the reaction through expression. One doesn’t want to get exposed to these interactions.
  • People have to apprehend the choices made, only then demand for such addictive games will stop, while supply also needs to be stopped. 
  • It brings about structural and functional changes in brains. It deprives one of sound mental health. It will eventually lead to vulnerable disorders apart from depression like, anxiety, bipolar disorder etc.

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