Only 37 per cent men in India trust their wives’ driving skills

Nupur Pradhan
Tuesday, 3 April 2018

Pune: Once you know how to drive in India, you can drive anywhere in the world - is what we have been hearing since childhood. The statement has a negative connotation to it as Indian roads witness the worst cases of lawlessness and road rage. How bad exactly is the driving scenario in the country?

Nissan India recently conducted a national survey- Nissan Connected Families - amongst car owners in 20 states, targeting 2,100 adults between the age group of 21-50 years. The online survey was conducted to gain insights on driving habits and preferences of Indians.

Pune: Once you know how to drive in India, you can drive anywhere in the world - is what we have been hearing since childhood. The statement has a negative connotation to it as Indian roads witness the worst cases of lawlessness and road rage. How bad exactly is the driving scenario in the country?

Nissan India recently conducted a national survey- Nissan Connected Families - amongst car owners in 20 states, targeting 2,100 adults between the age group of 21-50 years. The online survey was conducted to gain insights on driving habits and preferences of Indians.

The survey threw in some surprises and mirrored a few of the age-old stereotypes we have all grown up with. The most obvious one of it was spousal trust while driving - 64 per cent females trust their husbands whereas a mere 37 per cent men trust their wives with driving!However, the highlight of the survey was the general trend among people for the need for technology in cars to stay connected to their families.

Trusting women
Though it is believed (by men itself) that men are better drivers, only 37 per cent of them trust their wives when it comes to driving as opposed to 64 per cent women who trust their husbands.

When it comes to children, only 30 per cent of parents trust their children’s driving skills, with one in every two respondents from the State doubting that their children sneak out with their car after they have slept.

The respondents in the survey across the country opted for the need for vehicle tracking within the family as relatives in the east and west of India are more worried when their family member is driving than north and south. Mothers, as believed, are more trustworthy towards their children as per the survey and claim their children never sneak out at night.

Staying connected
Indians cannot live without their mobile phones. With low call rates and Internet available at throw-away prices, we are repeat offenders when it comes to mobile phone use while driving.

Around 56 per cent people from Maharashtra have admitted to using their phones. An astonishing 62 per cent drivers in north India and 52 per cent people in south India are glued to their screens instead of the road while driving. Approximately, 30 per cent of drivers in western India have confessed to have been caught by the cops in the survey, 33 per cent of them from Maharashtra.

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