Fadnavis should quit before his party sacks him: Congress

PTI
Thursday, 26 July 2018

Maharashtra Congress chief Ashok Chavan said the law and order situation in the state was bad because of "poor decision-making of the chief minister".

MUMBAI: Accusing him of mishandling the Maratha quota agitation, the Congress today demanded that Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis should quit before his own party decides to show him the door.

Violence was witnessed at many places during yesterday's shut-down called by Maratha outfits demanding reservations in government jobs and educational institutes.

Speaking to the media here, state Congress chief Ashok Chavan said the law and order situation in the state was bad because of "poor decision-making of the chief minister".

Asked about Shiv Sena leader Sanjay Raut's claim that there was "talk" within the BJP that the state leadership should be changed, Chavan said, "Congress is not concerned about the BJP's internal issues.

"The fact is that law and order situation in the state is not good, and the state government and Fadnavis are responsible for that. We want him to quit before being replaced," said the former chief minister.

Chavan denied the allegation that Fadnavis was being targeted because he is a non-Maratha.

"There is absolutely no truth to this allegation. The promise of providing reservations to the Marathas and Dhangars which he made was not implemented, resulting in unrest," said Chavan.

Mumbai Congress chief Sanjay Nirupam said Fadnavis was the home Minister as well, but he was nowhere to be seen yesterday.

"He even cancelled his scheduled meeting in Sangli fearing protesters. He broke the tradition of chief minister performing the annual Ashadhi Ekadashi Puja at Pandharpur. He should resign before being removed," Nirupam said.

Asked about reports that the Centre was planning to introduce reservations based on economic status, Chavan said until socially backward classes are brought into the mainstream completely, it must be debated whether reservations on economic grounds are appropriate. "It could lead to new issues," he said. 

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