The many avatars

Amrita Prasad
Monday, 28 August 2017

Every year, we buy idols, but the joy of making Bappa with your own hands is unparalleled. We catch up with a few individuals who have made eco-friendly and creative idols with scrap material, pulses, chocolate and so on

 I made Ganesha idol with shadu clay and painted it with watercolours. I used the same idol for the festival at home. I have also used eco-friendly (coloured paper) material for the other decorations as well.  
— Netra Bhangale

Every year, we buy idols, but the joy of making Bappa with your own hands is unparalleled. We catch up with a few individuals who have made eco-friendly and creative idols with scrap material, pulses, chocolate and so on

 I made Ganesha idol with shadu clay and painted it with watercolours. I used the same idol for the festival at home. I have also used eco-friendly (coloured paper) material for the other decorations as well.  
— Netra Bhangale

The thought of distributing prasad with a bit of Lord Ganesha in it has always intrigued me. Hence I handcrafted Ganesha using chocolate and caramel. I did visarjan in milk so that the chocolate would get dissolved in the milk and shared as prasad. The essence of Lord Ganesha has always been within us, but this small act has given me immense satisfaction and oneness with Bappa!”
— Anita Santosh

My Ganapati is made from coconut shell. The moment I thought of making it from coconut it struck me that the shell is naturally shaped like Ganapati. But some parts required cutting the shell in desired shapes with a hacksaw blade which was a demanding task. Later, finetuning was done by filing it and smoothening the corners. The different parts were pasted with minimum use of chemical glue. I avoided painting it to maintain the raw feel of the material. That’s how this Ganapati looks totally natural.

— Prasad Bhardwaja

Ganesha can be seen everywhere and worshipped in any form. The form of Ganesha itself is so intriguing that it inspires you to recreate it using any material. I have created a Ganapati idol using soaps in different colours like orange, white and sea green, and used marker pens to draw eyes and define his features.
— Ankita Malviya

 Ganapati idols are common but thinking out of the box, I have tried to recreate the lord in a different way — by making dream catchers. Dream catchers are great decorative items and trap positive energy and when infused with Ganesha  become all the more auspicious. I have made these dream catchers using vibrant hues along with other eye-catching embellishments.
— Tina Malkani

 A six feet tall Chaar Bhujadhaari Vighnaharta sculpture has been made from various automobile scrap parts which were almost 10 to 15 mm in thickness. They were bent and welded together and meticulously shaped to make a complete metal sculpture. This Ganapati idol has been made from over 900 kg of Ford car parts like disc brakes, fenders, clutch plates, flat gears, shaft gears, spark plugs, connecting rods, automobile chains, crank shafts, just to name a few. The Mooshak (mouse) is also made from gears, nuts, bolts and also with a piston block and a wrought iron tail. This project was executed for Ford Motors in association with Madhvi Pittie (co- founder at workshopQ).

— Nishant Sudhakaran

I have created many Ganesha images on a piece of cloth, each one using a different material. One of the images has been created using different types of dal (pulses) like masoor, moong, toor, etc. Another Ganesha has been made using different types of beans like chawli, flat beans, gawar, etc. In one of the images, I have used different vegetables like cabbage, cucumber, bottle gourd, snake gourd, carrot, etc. Other creations include a big Ganesha made of roses on a big basket, one made with spoons, bangles, legumes and so on.

— Avlokita Mane

 I have made two Ganesha idols — one in bronze and the other one in fibre glass. For the bronze idol, the model was first prepared in clay and then the casting was done in bronze. A lot of post casting efforts and polishing finally gave this form of Ganapati. This is one of its kind and is about 12 inches in height. With fibre glass, again, I first did it in clay and then cast in fibre. It’s about 7 inches in height.

— Sheela Chamaria

I have created Ganapati idol with shadu clay and coconut fibre and have used poster colours for painting. While the materials used are eco-friendly, vibrant colours like purple, yellow, golden, red and blue along with some pastel shades have been used to make the idol look more colourful.

— Ashay Dhavale

This is my first attempt at making Ganapati from eco-friendly shadu clay.  I have refrained from using any chemical paint and have only used haldi and kumkum to paint the idol as they are pure and considered auspicious. To accentuate the look, I have used coloured pearls and stones as embellishments.

— Akshata Thakar

 

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