Life beneath the waves

Amrita Prasad
Monday, 21 May 2018

It is quite surprising that despite the oceans holding about 96.5 per cent of all earth’s water, they still remain the most unexplored and undiscovered treasure of nature. 

Sir David Attenborough, naturalist and broadcaster, who has spent decades filming and discovering the wonders of the earth and its spectacular life forms, calls oceans ‘mysterious, beautiful, dangerous and full of surprises.’ This description was especially evident when we watched the screening of Sony BBC Earth’s Blue Planet II: One Ocean & The Deep at PVR.

It is quite surprising that despite the oceans holding about 96.5 per cent of all earth’s water, they still remain the most unexplored and undiscovered treasure of nature. 

Sir David Attenborough, naturalist and broadcaster, who has spent decades filming and discovering the wonders of the earth and its spectacular life forms, calls oceans ‘mysterious, beautiful, dangerous and full of surprises.’ This description was especially evident when we watched the screening of Sony BBC Earth’s Blue Planet II: One Ocean & The Deep at PVR.

Attenbourough, who is the narrator of the film and Hans Zimmer, who has scored music for it, take us to a world which has never been seen before. The film consists of two parts — One Ocean and The Deep. The first part takes you on a voyage that ranges from the tropical warm waters to the Antarctica. 

We learn about the living beings that are indigenous to each region beneath the water. It is interesting to see how bottlenose dolphins teach their young ones to immune themselves from infections by rubbing themselves against an underwater bush that has medicinal and antiseptic properties. Are they really any different from human parents? 

The survival of each creature on this planet is a struggle, and it is no different for the humble tuskfish, who travels far and wide on the reef, to look for its food. The film is a visual extravaganza that evokes emotions when you see the tuskfish procuring a clam, and carefully takes it to a ‘safe’ place and hits it against the rocky coral, again and again, until it breaks open for it to relish it peacefully.  

The tropical warm waters show the giant trevally, an apex predator hunt individually and in shoal, hunt the birds from the reef and humpback whales looking for meal in plankton. Due to human activities, the survival of the walruses and polar bears in Antarctica and coral reefs has become tough. However, their behavioural traits are a great watch.  
Had it not been for technology, it would have been nearly impossible for humans to dive deep into the heart of the ocean which has the harshest and the most hostile climatic conditions, and observe animals in situations that send chills down your spine even while watching them sitting in an airconditioned theatre. 

The next part of the film — The Deep —  takes you deeper and deeper into the ocean. The ocean is categorised into twilight and midnight zone. The light begins to fade and it eventually turns pitch dark and the pressure increasing thousand folds — yet one will be taken aback to find life thriving even in this part of the ocean. 

From swordfish, to the cock-eyed squid, the humboldt squid, the barreleye fish (which has a transparent head allowing it to look up through it), lantern fish, the twilight zone introduces you to creatures that make you bite your lips in amazement. And in the midnight zone, you will meet creatures that will remind you of aliens — their shapes seem to futuristic and complicated! 

The film also makes us aware of the volcanic activities happening on the ocean bed. They have elements that contribute to the existence of human beings on earth. So can we say that we actually metamorphasised from the water? Do watch the movie to search for answers. 

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